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FACULTY & STAFF

Faculty & Staff:
Ruth Enid Zambrana, Ph.D., Director
Laura A. Logie, Ph.D., Assistant Director
Bonnie Thornton Dill, Ph.D., Founding Director
Wendy Hall, Program Management Specialist



Ruth E. Zambrana, Ph.D.
Director
rzambran@umd.edu


Ruth Enid Zambrana, Ph.D. is currently a Professor in the Women’s Studies Department, Director of the Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity and Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine at University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine.  Dr. Zambrana served as Interim Director of the US Latino Studies Initiative at the University of Maryland, College Park from 2007-2009. She has worked in the areas of health and educational disparities of low-income and Latino women, children and families for over three decades. 

Dr. Zambrana’s work focuses on the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, institutional access factors, and health behaviors and their association with the health status of low-income Latino groups.  Her scholarship emphasizes the heterogeneity in life course outcomes based on national origin and socioeconomic status within and across the Latino population. 

Her latest book is Latinos in American Society: Families and Communities in Transition (Cornell University Press, 2011). Her relevant books include: Emerging Intersections: Race, Class, and Gender in Theory, Policy and Practice (co-edited with Bonnie Thornton Dill, Rutgers University Press 2009); Drawing from the Data: Working Effectively with Latino Families (Co-editor, 2004); Health Issues in the Latino Community (Co-editor with Aguirre-Molina, & M., Molina, C., 2001); and Understanding Latino Families: Scholarship, Policy and Practice (1995). Published articles include a syntheses of Latina health status entitled Disparities in Latina Health: an Intersectional Analyses (2006) and Disparities in Hypertension-Related Mortality by Hispanics by Subgroup and Gender: Implications for Preventive Interventions (2007).  In 2010, Dr. Zambrana was appointed by the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine (IOM) as a member of the Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Issues and Research Gaps and Opportunities.

Laura
Laura A. Logie, PhD
Assistant Director
lauraalogie@hotmail.com
(please note two A's in the address)

Dr. Laura A. Logie is Faculty Research Assistant, an Affiliate Faculty of the Department of Women’s Studies and Assistant Director for the Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity at the University of Maryland, College Park. She received her B.S.Ed degree in Health Education and Promotion from George Mason University, and an MA and PhD from the University of Maryland in Women’s Studies. Before joining the PhD program at the University of Maryland, Dr. Logie coordinated several funded Latino projects including: Annie E. Casey/Family Support America, “Promising Practices in Family Support for Latino Families with Young Children.” Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, "Latino Children: Providing a Research Synthesis for Promoting Relevant Child Health Policy." Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, "Assessment of Child and Family Welfare Needs in the Hispanic Community of the Washington Metropolitan Area: Developing the Foundation for Future Collaborative Projects."

Her research interests focus on intersectional analysis of persistent social inequalities, feminist perspectives on health and social justice and the health of low-income racial/ethnic women. Her dissertation entitled: An Intersectional Gaze at Latinidad, Nation, Gender and Self-Perceived Health Status provides an opportunity to foster a critical dialogue in feminist scholarship that informs social science theorizing and empirical research, bridges gaps between theory and practice, and enhances efforts to eliminate the social inequalities that drive persistent disparities in health by gender, race, ethnicity, immigration status and class. She is the co-author of several articles including: The Environmental Health of Latino Children, Journal of Pediatric Health Care. (2007). Hispanic Child Health Issues are Key to Achieving National Goals, BioMedicina, (2001), and Latino Child Health: Need for Inclusion in US National Discourse, American Journal of Public Health, (2000).



Bonnie Thornton Dill, PhD
Founding Director, CRGE

Bonnie Thornton Dill is Professor of Women’s Studies and Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland. Dr. Dill is also the Founding Director of the Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity (CRGE). She is an affiliate faculty with the departments of Sociology, Afro-American Studies, and American Studies. From 1995-1998, she coordinated a three year Afro-American Studies seminar/workshop funded by the Ford Foundation on "Meanings and Representations of Black Women’s Work." Before coming to Women’s Studies in the fall of 1991, Dr. Dill was a professor of Sociology at the University of Memphis, where she founded the Center for Research on Women and served as director from 1982-1988.

Her research focuses on the intersections of race, class, and gender with an emphasis on African American women and families. She is currently interested in the development of intersectional work across disciplines and has served as a consultant to the Ford Foundation on this topic. She oversees a research project studying single mothers in rural southern communities. Dr. Dill’s recent published works include: "A Better Life for Me and My Children: Low Income Single Mothers’ Struggle for Self Sufficiency in the Rural South," Journal of Comparative Family Studies (1998); "Valuing Families Differently: Race, Poverty and Welfare Reform," with Maxine Baca Zinn and Sandra Patton, Sage Race Relations Abstracts (1998), "African Americans in the Rural South: The Persistence of Race and Poverty," with Bruce Williams, in The American Countryside, ed. Castle (1996); "Theorizing Difference from Multi-racial Feminism," with Maxine Baca Zinn, Feminist Studies (Summer 1996). Most recently she co-edited Emerging Intersections: Race, Class, and Gender in Theory, Policy and Practice (2009). Dr. Dill is currently the President of the National Women Studies Association (NWSA).

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Wendy Hall
Program Management Specialist
hallw@umd.edu


Wendy Hall serves as Program Management Specialist for the Consortium. She joined the staff of CRGE in July 2002. Prior to that, Hall served as an Office Manager for a local CPA firm. Wendy passed her A+ Certification exam in July 2002 and is currently pursuing her Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) Certification.


 

Though diverse in subject matter and format, intersectional work is characterized by

1) an analytical strategy that begins with the experiences and struggles of previously excluded and oppressed groups – primarily people of color – and examines the ways multiple sectors influence their life choices and chances;

2) an examination of the nature of power and its implementation in maintaining interconnected structures of inequality that affect individual and group identities and experiences; and

3) efforts to promote social justice and social change by linking research and practice, thus creating a holistic approach to the eradication of disparities.

For further reading on intersectionality, please browse our Intersectional Research Database.